Dental Emergency In My Child

Be Prepared For A Dental Emergency.

Dental emergencies are bound to come up when you have young children. Dr. Harbin and our team at Hendersonville Family Dentistry want you to be prepared in case you run into a difficult situation. Problems may vary, from minor gum irritation to knock-out-teeth. Take a  look at the different possibilites and how you can handle them.

Dental Emergency Vs. Not Dental Emergency.

Teething pain is as normal as your child’s first set of teeth falling out. On the other hand, if a baby tooth is knocked out in a forceful accident, make sure you bring him or her into Hendersonville Family Dentistry to check that other damage hasn’t occurred in the mouth. On occasion, permanent teeth may grow in before baby teeth have fallen out. This may not cause any discomfort, but Dr. Harbin and Dr. Jones should make sure the teeth are growing in properly. Catching teeth that are coming in incorrectly can prevent issues from arising into adult hood.

If your child is suffering from bleeding gums, rinse your child’s mouth with warm salt water and apply light pressure to the area. If you become concerned about the amount of blood, contact our office and we will schedule an appointment for your little one as soon as possible.

Don’t forget as a parent you provide the best education to your children on the importance of proper oral hygiene by setting a good example.

 

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Is Your Child’s Diet Safe For Their Teeth?

Diet Plays A Major Role

The food you feed your child can have a lasting effect on his or her oral health. In fact diet plays a major role in whether a child develops cavities and decay, which can lead to many dental visits and potential tooth loss. So what should you feed your child to ensure he or she has a healthy smile for life.

Foods & Beverages To Avoid

Healthy foods can present the threat of decay too. Some of the most common culprits are sticky foods like peanut butter, raisins, and granola bars, which can stick to the teeth after eating. If you serve these foods to your child, be sure to have him or her brush immediately after eating to remove any lingering sugary residue.

Make an effort to serve only water to your child any time other than meal times. During meals, allow your child to have milk or juice, but in limited serving sizes. Most importantly, never allow your young child to sleep with a bottle or “sippie cup” full of juice or milk. Doing so can cause rapid tooth decay, a condition known as bottle caries.

As long as your child is brushing regularly and eating a healthy, balanced diet full of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains you should have little or no problem with tooth decay.